Summer Program

Homeless children are especially prone to summer learning loss. They are less likely to read independently or participate in enrichment programs compared to their more advantaged peers. The goal of the School on Wheels, Inc. Summer Program is to fill in the gaps of students’ knowledge of English language arts (ELA), including critical thinking, reading and reading comprehension, grammar and writing skills, and to provide a structured and engaging program to prevent student summer learning loss. Students and tutors will choose a book based on grade (K-12), and tutors will be provided with lesson suggestions each week. Students and tutors will read together and work to identify and eliminate student learning gaps. They will complete a final project based on a creative interpretation of the book in the final weeks for a chance to win tablets and gift cards!
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Overview (8 Steps):

1. Sign up to participate in the Summer Program.

2. Download/print our flyer (English / Spanish) and begin talking to your student and their parent(s)/guardian(s) about the Summer Program.
Remember, we aren’t just homework helpers. It will be fun! Student gets to pick books, create a final project, and win prizes. Stop the summer slide!

3. Browse our Book List and pick a book or two to read with your student.

4. Visit a local library or stop by our Fletcher Square Resource Center, Skid Row Learning Center, or Ventura Resource Center to pick up your books. Please make sure to email summer@schoolonwheels.org with your 1. pick up date and time and 2. book selection before coming by.

5. Give your student a pre-assessment according to their last completed grade level to identify gaps (grades K-7 only).
Older students can either complete the 7th-grade ELA assessment or simply discuss their ELA learning needs with you.

6. Receive Weekly Lessons via email and engage your student in activities (always keeping in mind the gaps identified in the assessment).

7. Complete a creative final project with your student and compete for gift cards and a prize*

Elementary School (K-5): $50.00 Amazon gift card for the winning student AND tutor
Middle School (6-8): $50.00 Amazon gift card for the winning student AND tutor
High School (9-12): $50.00 Amazon gift card for the winning student AND tutor
Most Improved Student (K-12): $50.00 Amazon gift card for student AND tutor
*All participants (students only) will be entered into a drawing for a tablet!

Final projects are due on Friday, August 10, 2018. NO late entries accepted!
Submit all final projects and questions to summer[at]schoolonwheels.org.

8. Give your student the corresponding post-assessment to identify the topic areas your student has improved on!

Please email summer[at]schoolonwheels.org if you need help with any of these steps. We’ll be happy to help you!

 

Info Session (23 minutes):

 

 


Weekly Lessons: K-3rd | 4th-12th

 

K-3rd

WEEK ONE: PRE-ASSESSMENT

1. Give your student a pre-assessment according to their last completed grade level to identify gaps and submit the assessment online so that you will receive an email with assessment results directing you to appropriate resources. 2. Identify 2-3 topic areas to work on with your student for the duration of the Summer Program. IMPORTANT: Keep the results! 3. Read with your student. NOTE: For grades K-3, you should read aloud to your student and/or have student work on their reading skills. If the student can read independently, you can read more than one short book. If the student cannot read independently, focus on getting them to read and understand one or two books by the end of the summer.
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WEEKS TWO & THREE: READING AND DISCUSSION

1. Watch the “Making Connections” video (15 minutes) with your student and discuss the following questions afterward: “Why is it important to make connections to what we read?” “What are the kinds of connections the video discussed?” 2. Make a bookmark with your student. 3. Read with your student and make sure to stop and ask questions (see below) throughout.

Before Reading:
What do you think the book is about based on the title?
What do you think the book is about based on the illustrations?

During Reading:
Who is/are the main characters?
Is the story real or imaginary?
If you could be one of the characters, who would you be? Why? (Text-to-Self)

After Reading:
Did you like the book? Why or why not?
What was one of the problems the main character faced?
Can you relate to something that happened to one of the characters? (Text-to-Self)
Have you ever read a story like this before? (Text-to-Text)
Is there another character that you know of who is like the main character in this story? (Text-to-Text)
How does this book relate to something that happened in the real world? (Text-to-World)
Would you be friends with (a character from the book)? Why or why not? (Text-to-Self)
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WEEKS FOUR & FIVE: ACTIVITIES (or make/bring your own!)

Grades K-1: a. Draw a picture or write a letter to a character from the book. b. Draw a picture that could be illustrated in the book and explain why you drew it. c. Create a connection pizza! Cut out 8 triangular pieces from a circle (using construction paper) and have your student write down a connection on each one (e.g. I love dogs like the main character, my brother got in trouble like the brother in the story, etc.)

Grades 2-3: “Making Connections” Game“Making Connections” WorksheetPaper Chain ActivitySurface vs. Deep Connections
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WEEKS SIX & SEVEN: FINAL PROJECT

Start on the final project! Your student can draw/paint a picture of a scene; write a poem, song, rap, or letter to a character; create an epilogue to the story; turn a scene into a play; create a video story or video review; write a review for a newspaper; use a storytelling app to produce their own retelling; anything else you can think of! If you need any assistance, please email summer[at]schoolonwheels.org.

Final projects are due on Friday, August 10, 2018. NO late entries accepted!
Submit all final projects and questions to summer[at]schoolonwheels.org.

If you complete the final project before August 10: Use our Assessment Resources to target your student’s pre-assessment learning gaps.
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WEEK EIGHT: POST-ASSESSMENT

Give your student the corresponding post-assessment (same grade level as the pre-assessment your student completed in Week One) and submit the assessment online. Compare pre- and post-assessment results to see what topic areas your student has improved on!

Then, begin to talk to your students about the upcoming school year: 1. Watch our Back to School webinar to learn about best practices for easing your student into the school year. Topics include setting goals, getting organized, and using our website to find resources. 2. Ask your student if they need any materials or equipment (new backpack, school supplies) for the upcoming school year. Make sure to reach out to your Regional Coordinator about these needs. 3. Talk to your student about our Scholarship Programs and encourage them to apply!
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4th-12th

WEEK ONE: PRE-ASSESSMENT

1. Give your student a pre-assessment according to their last completed grade level to identify gaps and submit the assessment online so that you will receive an email with assessment results directing you to appropriate resources. 2. Identify 2-3 topic areas to work on with your student for the duration of the Summer Program. IMPORTANT: Keep the results! (NOTE: If your student is above a 7th grade reading level, work with them to identify ELA areas to target over summer using previous year’s homework and tests.) 3. Play the “Making Connections” Game and review the “Making Connections” Infographic with your student, then discuss: “Why is it important to make connections to what we read?” 4. Introduce the book to your student and, if there is time, begin reading together. 5. Let your student know that they need to complete the first chapter your next session. Encourage them to circle or underline parts of the chapter that they find interesting.
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WEEK TWO: READING AND DISCUSSION

1. Read with your student and make sure to stop and ask questions (see below for examples). 2. Let your student know that they need to read a certain amount of chapters for next week. Encourage them to circle or underline parts of the chapters that they find interesting.

Before Reading:
What do you think the book is about based on the title?
What do you think the book is about based on the illustrations?

During Reading:
Who is/are the main characters?
Is the story real or imaginary?
If you could be one of the characters, who would you be? Why? (Text-to-Self)

After Reading:
Did you like the book? Why or why not?
What was one of the problems the main character faced?
Can you relate to something that happened to one of the characters? (Text-to-Self)
Have you ever read a story like this before? (Text-to-Text)
Is there another character that you know of who is like the main character in this story? (Text-to-Text)
How does this book relate to something that happened in the real world? (Text-to-World)
Would you be friends with (a character from the book)? Why or why not? (Text-to-Self)
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WEEKS THREE & FOUR: TEXT-TO-SELF

1. Check-In: Ask your student how they like the book so far. “What happened in the book this week that surprised you? Why?” 2. Model Text-to-Self: Read your favorite part of the book to your student and tell them what it made you think of in your own life (see “Text-to-Self” questions below). You are modeling for your student what you would like them to do. 3. Practice Text-to-Self: Ask your student to pick their favorite part of the book out loud. Ask them why they chose that part. What made them enjoy it (or not)? Make sure they give a substantial answer rather than “just because.” 4. Text-to-Self Activity: 10-minute Writing Prompt: Has this (an event in the book) ever happened to me? How is my life different from what has happened in the book so far? If what happened to the main character happened to me, how would I react? Or, write a letter to the main character to give them advice. NOTE: Feel free to write along with your student. Share your answers with each other (or as a group). 5. Homework: Assign a certain amount of chapters for your student to read before your next session. Encourage them to circle or underline parts of the chapters that they find interesting and remind them to ask themselves “Text-to-Self” questions (see below) while reading.

If you have any extra time during your sessions: Use our Assessment Resources to target your student’s pre-assessment learning gaps.

Text-to-Self
What does this remind me of in my life?
What is this similar to in my life?
How is this different from my life?
Has something like this ever happened to me?
How does this relate to my life?
What were my feelings when I read this?
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WEEK FIVE: TEXT-TO-TEXT

1. Check-In: Ask your student: “How is the reading going? Any difficulties?” (Make sure student is keeping up.) Ask your student how they think the book is going to end. Talk to your student about how you felt about certain parts of the book: “I found myself getting annoyed when…”, “I loved the part when….”. 2. Text-to-Text Discussion: Ask your student: “What other books, TV shows, movies, or other art does this story remind me of? Why?” TIP: Can your student make meaningful and relevant connections between the text and other texts? If not – if your student’s connections are random or unclear, or merely causal – model a text-to-text example for your student before prompting again. You can also play the “Making Connections” Game and review the “Making Connections” Infographic with your student (activity from WEEK ONE). 3. Text-to-Text Activity: One-Page Comic Prompt: “How are the characters in this book similar to or different from other characters I’ve seen in other books, TV shows, movies, etc.?” Have your student create a one-page comic featuring a character of their choice from the book as well as a character from another book, TV show, movie, etc. that they find similar or different. NOTE: Feel free to create a comic too. Share your comics with each other (or together as a group). 4. Homework: Assign a certain amount of chapters for your student to read before your next session. Encourage them to circle or underline parts of the chapters that they find interesting and remind them to ask themselves “Text-to-Text” questions (see below) while reading.

If you have any extra time during your sessions: Use our Assessment Resources to target your student’s pre-assessment learning gaps.

Text-to-Text
What does this remind me of in another book I’ve read?
How is this text similar to other things I’ve read?
How is this different from other books I’ve read?
Have I read about something like this before?
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WEEK SIX: TEXT-TO-WORLD

1. Check-In: Ask your student: “If you could change anything about the book so far, what would you change and why?” If your student has finished the book, ask them if they would recommend it to a friend and why. 2. Text-to-World Discussion: Introduce your students to “text-to-world” using the “Making Connections” infographic and discuss how it differs from “text-to-self” and “text-to-text”. Then, ask your student: “Why do you think it is important to relate the things we read to ourselves, other texts, and the world?” Discuss why the writer may have intended to have the reader make connections to the real world. Talk about the writer’s background and how the writer’s worldview may have shaped and influenced their writing. 3. Text-to-World Activity: “You Go, I Go!”: Have your student name their favorite book, TV show, movie, etc. and tell your student to ask you what you think that book, TV show, movie, etc. is similar to in the real world. If you’re able to make a meaningful and relevant text-to-world connection, give yourself one point and raise one finger. Next, name YOUR favorite book, TV show, movie, etc. and ask your student to make a text-to-world connection. If they are able to, they get one point and raise one finger. If they aren’t, move on. Repeat! The first person to ten (10) points, wins! NOTE: Please be mindful of the appropriate content of the books, TV shows, movies, etc. you select.

If you have any extra time during your sessions: Use our Assessment Resources to target your student’s pre-assessment learning gaps.

Text-to-World
What does this remind me of in the real world?
How is this text similar to things that happen in the real world?
How is this different from things that happen in the real world?
How did that part relate to the world around me?
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WEEK SEVEN: FINAL PROJECT

Start on the final project! Your student can draw/paint a picture of a scene; write a poem, song, rap, or letter to a character; create an epilogue to the story; turn a scene into a play; create a video story or video review; write a review for a newspaper; use a storytelling app to produce their own retelling; anything else you can think of! If you need any assistance, please email summer[at]schoolonwheels.org.

Final projects are due on Friday, August 10, 2018. NO late entries accepted!
Submit all final projects and questions to summer[at]schoolonwheels.org.

If you complete the final project before August 10: Use our Assessment Resources to target your student’s pre-assessment learning gaps.
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WEEK EIGHT: POST-ASSESSMENT

Give your student the corresponding post-assessment (same grade level as the pre-assessment your student completed in Week One) and submit the assessment online. Compare pre- and post-assessment results to see what topic areas your student has improved on!

Then, begin to talk to your students about the upcoming school year: 1. Watch our Back to School webinar to learn about best practices for easing your student into the school year. Topics include setting goals, getting organized, and using our website to find resources. 2. Ask your student if they need any materials or equipment (new backpack, school supplies) for the upcoming school year. Make sure to reach out to your Regional Coordinator about these needs. 3. Talk to your student about our Scholarship Programs and encourage them to apply!